Insights through Disruption: Buddhemes and Charism

Insight through questioning: assumptions & buddhemes To question is to disrupt. To challenge what is deemed as normal is to initiate dissention. Questioning pre-established positions, assumed knowledge and social constructs with questions that are both personally relevant and timely is one of the central elements of a fresh and independent engagement. Owen Flannigan in his … Continue reading Insights through Disruption: Buddhemes and Charism

Reconsidering enlightenment: a project in reconfiguration (6)

Stage three: non-returner The third stage of this model points to the elimination of desire and ill will, although frankly the idea that a human can exist without desire in some form appears deluded. If a human-animal had an absolute absence of desire, wouldn’t they be reduced to functioning as a human automaton? Isn’t desire … Continue reading Reconsidering enlightenment: a project in reconfiguration (6)

Reconsidering enlightenment: a project in reconfiguration (5)

Stage Two: once returner These stages are positional anchors, representing markers on an evolutionary line: they are not fixed in stone. The second and third stages could be considered as a single stage as new fetters are not dissolved but weakened before being thoroughly abandoned at the end of stage three. At the second stage, … Continue reading Reconsidering enlightenment: a project in reconfiguration (5)

Considering enlightenment: a project in reconfiguration (4)

Fetters n. A device, usually one of a pair of rings connected to a chain that is attached to the ankles or feet to restrict movement. Something that serves to restrict; a restraint: the fetters of tyranny. tr.v. fet·tered, fet·ter·ing, fet·ters To put fetters on; shackle. To restrict or restrain: thinking that is fettered by … Continue reading Considering enlightenment: a project in reconfiguration (4)

The Eightfold Path: Right Action (2)

Part two continues by exploring the themes of theft, sexual misconduct, and cruelty as the basic elements of unethical behaviour. In exploring these three areas of unethical behaviour we might reach the conclusion that actively practising their opposites could be a good idea. Instead of killing, that is taking life, we might see that preserving … Continue reading The Eightfold Path: Right Action (2)